Sheathing

 Before sheathing

Before sheathing

The process of sheathing the tiny home was conducted with material optimization and ease of construction as top priorities, using full OSB sheets where possible and minimizing cuts on all other sheets. We used 48"x96"x.4375" OSB sheets and secured them with 1.25" drywall screws.

The exterior sheathing brought an impressive level of lateral stability to the tiny home structure; the tiny home now has no sway or deflection, as it did before the sheathing was applied.

 West Wall

West Wall

 South Wall

South Wall

Panels on the walls were staggered and oriented horizontally in order to 'bind' 4' framing modules together, giving added stability to the wall framing. The same principle was applied to the roof, with panels staggered and oriented in the long direction of the roof to 'bind' framing modules together; however, we used .5" thick panels as we rafters were 24" on-center. This logic breaks occasionally, such as at the South wall, where the panels around the window were sized to line up with the clear opening, using the largest panel sizes possible and avoiding complicated cuts.

At the perimeter of each sheet, screws were applied on 8" centers, while screws were applied on 12" centers in the middle of the sheet where vertical studs were located.

Smooth face of OSB oriented to the exterior face was a mistake but not a fatal one. The other side of the OSB is rough and has vertical and horizontal lines for nailing and screwing lines (we now know that).

 All walls sheathed

All walls sheathed

The exterior sheathing for the walls and roof was applied in a single day with three people. The use of ladders and scaffolding were essential to the safe and clean installation of the wall panels, while a forklift was very useful in getting OSB sheets safely onto the roof. 

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The installation of the sheathing gave us the first sense of interior enclosure within the tiny home. The space was surprisingly much as we had imagined it, and the amount of light permitted by the window and door openings seemed highly conducive to the sense of openness and natural lighting we had intended. 

 Fully Sheathed Exterior

Fully Sheathed Exterior

 Fully Sheathed Interior

Fully Sheathed Interior

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For the roof sheathing, we used sheathing clips. They helped in aligning the panels in both direction and maintain consistent expansion gaps. In hindsight, using clips on the walls would be a highly recommend process. The clips also help secure on panel to another for added wind assisted panel tear. 

Kadim Alasady

USA

I graduated with a Masters of Architecture from the University of Kansas in May 2013. During my final graduate year there, I conducted a thesis project with an emphasis on parametric tool sets, mathematics, and structural typologies. Using the Sagrada Familia Church in Barcelona by Antonio Gaudi as a precedent, I explored computation methods to inform the processes in architecture and in the composition of spatial experience. My interest in these subjects continues to serve as a trajectory to guide my independent research and the development of personal projects. My journey through architectural education has given me a strong and diverse skill set which allows me to explore many fields in the digital arts and design. When I am not working architecturally, I am in a constant pursuit to experiment with my creative impulse. This experimentation ranges from modeling starships, thinking about composition, touring art and design galleries, working in the shop, etc.