Roof Framing

tlw_blog_roof_framing (12 of 12).jpg

The framing of the roof was the most challenging tiny home construction exercise to date; this was due primarily to the unique geometry around cutting and the need to be elevated during installation. Our friend, Ian, spent an entire day with us installing and troubleshooting the roof framing. Kadim had done all of the cutting of the rafters the day before.

While we did have scaffolding, a fork lift, and ladders available to us, the process of installation was considerably ad hoc, and we finally developed confidence and the best installation methods by the time we reached the final roof rafter.

 Ian was rightfully skeptical of Kadim's temporary lateral bracing techniques.

Ian was rightfully skeptical of Kadim's temporary lateral bracing techniques.

 Considerable attention to detail was required in order to install and align the roof rafters in coordination with the 2x10 columns. 

Considerable attention to detail was required in order to install and align the roof rafters in coordination with the 2x10 columns. 

 Again, the skepticism. Again, justified.

Again, the skepticism. Again, justified.

The roof installation at the loft end was reasonably smooth, due to the fixed, elevated surface that could allow the roof connections to be easily accessed and managed. The floor surfaces had not yet been installed in the other parts of the tiny home, so coordinating ladders and tools was one of the largest parts of the roof installation effort, not to mention elevating each 2"x6"x10' roof timber. 

 Strategizing, and probably exchanging snarky remarks.

Strategizing, and probably exchanging snarky remarks.

tlw_blog_roof_framing (7 of 12).jpg

Before the installation of the rafters, the walls were considerably insecure; one good push and pull would have the entire house swaying. However, once the rafters were installed, the entire skeleton became much more rigid, and we expect that the exterior and interior sheathing will give it full rigidity and structural soundness.

Kadim Alasady

USA

I graduated with a Masters of Architecture from the University of Kansas in May 2013. During my final graduate year there, I conducted a thesis project with an emphasis on parametric tool sets, mathematics, and structural typologies. Using the Sagrada Familia Church in Barcelona by Antonio Gaudi as a precedent, I explored computation methods to inform the processes in architecture and in the composition of spatial experience. My interest in these subjects continues to serve as a trajectory to guide my independent research and the development of personal projects. My journey through architectural education has given me a strong and diverse skill set which allows me to explore many fields in the digital arts and design. When I am not working architecturally, I am in a constant pursuit to experiment with my creative impulse. This experimentation ranges from modeling starships, thinking about composition, touring art and design galleries, working in the shop, etc.